Red Queen

No Spoilers.

red_queen_book_coverI’ve been following Victoria Aveyard on Twitter for a while now. While I’ve found her book blurb intriguing enough, I was never in any rush to read it. It sounded unoriginal to me. A world where some people have silver blood and superpowers, and the rest are just plain, red-blooded humans who are seen and treated as inferior. But then there’s a girl who’s red-blooded and has superpowers and everyone goes crazy from the confusion. Continue reading

A Fierce and Subtle Poison

Mild Spoilers at the end. I'll let you know.
poison

I’m pretty sure every plant on this piece of art is poisonous, maybe even deadly. Bold colours to catch your eye and still easy to read. Cover by Allison Colpoys.

A Fierce and Subtle Poison, I am happy to say, is as good a book as it’s cover. I took a chance on this one, having never heard of it before. The cover told me the bare minimum about the book, but the first sentence of chapter 1 told me everything else I’d need to know: Continue reading

Book Review: Soundless

Soundless by Richelle Mead. No Spoilers.

Soundless-Richelle-Mead

This cover design by Lindsey Andrews is absolutely beautiful.

I actually finished this book the day I posted the book review for The Wrath and The Dawn, but I thought having two book reviews in a row would be a bit much, especially since the last one before that was in April. I got these two books for Christmas and I didn’t want to bring them on the plane back to uni, so I finished them right away. Continue reading

Book Review: The Book Thief

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. No Spoilers.

Illustration by Finn Campbell-Notman, Design by Claire Ward

I’ve been meaning to read this book for years. I first picked it up in twelfth grade. I had been on a streak of Holocaust stories including The Diary of Anne Frank, Hanna’s Briefcase, and Yellow Star. It blew my mind (and still does) at the scale of destruction and death that one man managed to cause, and these stories of survival and humanity in the face of such horrors were amazing to me. The Book Thief would have shown me the war from a very different angle, had I gotten beyond the first chapter at that time.

A couple of months ago, I showed my teacher a first chapter I had written. It was all I had of what might eventually become a novel, and it was told from the perspective of the devil. My teacher quite liked it, and he suggested I read The Book Thief because it was narrated by Death. By now, I had completely forgotten the first chapter I’d read years ago, but it piqued my interest and after class I went to the library and borrowed it.

Let me tell you, it was definitely worth getting through the slow first chapter to read the rest of it. Continue reading